The historic port city of Cadiz has always held a sort of mystic allure for me so I was excited for us to road trip to the Atlantic coast from our base in Arcos de la Frontera. Just an hour's drive away, this narrow slice of land surrounded by sea is one of the sunniest cities in Spain (it receives over 300 days of sunshine a year).

Plaza in Old Town Cadiz

Plaza in Old Town Cadiz

Endless textural details in the intricate streets of Cadiz

Endless textural details in the intricate streets of Cadiz

Plaza de la Catedral 

Plaza de la Catedral 

Cádiz Cathedral, a combination of baroque and neoclassicist elements

Cádiz Cathedral, a combination of baroque and neoclassicist elements

We spent the afternoon wandering the labyrinthine streets of Old Town Cádiz. One of my favorite things about visiting smaller towns is that they're all so manageable on foot. On this tiny strip of land, the ocean is almost always at arms length and it's pretty comforting to get lost in the maze-like streets, knowing that you can find your way back out whenever you're ready. 

Many bars in Cadiz are famous for their "Pescaíto Frito" (assorted fried fish), always freshly caught

Many bars in Cadiz are famous for their "Pescaíto Frito" (assorted fried fish), always freshly caught

Very inexpensive local Andalusian specialties

Very inexpensive local Andalusian specialties

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Like the rest of Spain, Cádiz takes its siesta very seriously. We caught the first part of siesta hour, starting around 3pm, where the streets pretty much turn into a ghost town. To me, images above almost feel like stills from an abandoned film set. 

By now, we had strategized that the best part of siesta was driving from one town to another without missing any action. We hopped back in our rental and headed northwest on the coastal road towards Sanlúcar, arriving just when things were getting into the evening swing. 

The picturesque coastline of Cadiz

The picturesque coastline of Cadiz

Sanlúcar is known for its fishing and manzanilla sherry production. With limited time left in the day, we walked along Bajo de Guia beach and stopped for a light seafood dinner at Joselito Huerta. A family-run restaurant, it opened in 1955 serving sherry to local fisherman and then started frying their catch as well. Of course, we couldn't resist ordering the surtido (assorted fried fish), letting the chef surprise us with the catch of the day. Sharing this simple meal with ice cold beer and watching the sun set over the Guadalquivir River together was the perfect ending to an agenda-less day of meandering and exploring. 

Sunset in Sanlúcar

Sunset in Sanlúcar

Tapas with a view

Tapas with a view

The Guadalquivir River gleaming at dusk. Doñana National Park sits across on the other side of the river

The Guadalquivir River gleaming at dusk. Doñana National Park sits across on the other side of the river

Play: 

Cádiz Cathedral Plaza de la Catedral

Bajo de Guía Beach Sanlúcar de Barrameda

Feast:

Restaurante Joselito Huerta Av de Bajo de Guía, 30, 11540 Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Cádiz, Spain

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